The future of giving – a good business decision?

The popularity of museums today has never been better with over 50.8 million people visiting UK directly funded museums in 2013/14.

The popularity of museums today has never been better with over 50.8 million people visiting UK directly funded museums in 2013/14.

In a recent workshop we ran: The Future of Giving – Connecting with the Generous Generation, we explored  - with charities and “boomers” in attendance – how demographics is set to have a huge impact on the future of giving.

This is because a computer-literate older generation of “baby-boomers” are increasingly making decisions on philanthropic support based on online engagement.  This is more than giving money though: There is a shift in how donors wish to be involved when they give.

If baby-boomers are changing from the “Selfish Generation” to a “Generous Generation” where does big business fit in all this – as profits grow and boardrooms / shareholders buy-in to the Generous Generation philosophy?  Furthermore, in what way do business’ want to feel “involved” when they sponsor or invest in arts and heritage?

Recently my own company’s sponsorship of a local amateur orchestra turned a creative partnership (between a business and arts organisation) into our best sales strategy for many years. What can be achieved with big business working with arts and heritage in the same way? I want to find out, so I’m looking for partners for a national museum and heritage network: Museum and Heritage Show and Awards.

Museums have embraced innovative creative ways of engaging visitors both online and offline – often leading the way with digital apps and technology.

Museums have embraced innovative creative ways of engaging visitors both online and offline – often leading the way with digital apps and technology.

The popularity of museums today has never been better with over 50.8 million people visiting UK directly funded museums in 2013/14. These statistics don’t include those museums funded by charities, local authorities and educational establishments.   What happens when you add a digitally engaged museum audience to these numbers? Wouldn’t business benefit from reaching this audience at these levels?

While we have had challenging economic times over recent years our arts and heritage sector has adapted and showed great resilience.  Central Government arts funding at levels we were used to will never be there again, at the same time this creates an opportunity for arts and heritage to partner with business.

Museums bring communities together (both online and offline) to educate,  preserve, appreciate history, heritage and arts for us all and future generations. Museums have embraced innovative creative ways of engaging visitors both online and offline – often leading the way with digital apps and technology.  This is a great opportunity for business who also want to reach wider audiences.

If this resonates with you, as someone working with big brands who could benefit from connecting with a national arts and heritage network  (Museum and Heritage Show and Awards) let’s have a conversation and see where this may take us.

Contact me: claire@thedigitalmuseum.co.uk or @clairedesully

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